Is Shorter Better?

PS: Did you know that the Mona Lisa, so big in the cultural imagination, is only 30 inches tall and 21 inches wide? Small thing, giant impact!

PS: Did you know that the Mona Lisa, so big in the cultural imagination, is only 30 inches tall and 21 inches wide? Small thing, giant impact!

Brevity has power: When creating health content that resonates with readers, shorter is often better. Fewer words tend to make a bigger impact. 

But brevity isn't exclusively about length. Powerful brevity—what business executive and author Bernie Trilling calls deep brevity—is about the clarity of your thought process and the concision with which you convey those thoughts.

To do brevity right requires you to have A LOT of knowledge. You must know your topic inside and out. Brevity done right—deep brevity—is always born out of deep knowledge.

Blather on too long, or about the wrong thing, and you'll lose your reader in the constant stream of information.

Adopt a policy of deep brevity and your content will command attention—and convert readers into clients.

Weekly writing affirmation: I will get to the point.

Concisely,

Laine

 

 

Laine Bergeson